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Posts Tagged ‘Hospital’

Slur on RIMS Dir, shutdown

January 26, 2012 Leave a comment

IMPHAL, Jan 20 : PG students of RIMS, including interns and staff and numbering around 500 have abstained from casualty service and emergency with effect from 10 pm today, following an altercation with the Director of the institute.

Speaking to The Sangai Express, a group of students from RIMS said that security staff of RIMS accompanied by the Director descended on the girls’ hostel today evening at about 7 and confiscated all the electrical appliances without any prior information.

This was in violation of the rules of RIMS which say that no males are allowed inside the girls’ hostel, said the PG students and added that all the security personnel were males.

However RIMS Director said that it was a drive against use of electrical appliances, especially heaters and added that the warden was present, who is a woman. The PG students revolted, he added.

As news of the incident spread, a group of PG students including the PG Association went to meet the Director at his official quarters but they were stopped by the security personnel manning the residence of the Director and manhandled. The security personnel also verbally abused the PG students, claimed the students and added that they also pointed their guns at the students who merely wanted to talk things over with the Director over the incident.

Read More

via The Sangai Express

Categories: health, News Tags: , , ,

Bad weather affects routine operations in JN hospital, Porompat, Manipur

October 21, 2011 1 comment

Imphal, October 20: Routine operations in JN Hospital could not be conducted today, the reason? As the sun god refused to come out, washed clothes which were to be worn by the doctors, patients and other staffs during an operation, could not be dried. No dry cloths no operations, as simple as that.

The incident came to light when the family members of a patient whose operation was cancelled without giving proper reasons spoke to Hueiyen Lanpao.

Hueiyen Lanpao to its dismay found that the reason for cancelling the operation was because the clothes which were to be worn by the doctors and patients during the operation were still wet due to the cloudy weather which prevailed today.

When this reporter enquired about the incident, Okram Kirankumar, Supervisor of the Laundry, JN Hospital said that the clothes that are to be used in an operation are washed and sterilized and then passed on to the operation theatre after drying them up. The clothes are being dried in a drying comber machine. But unfortunately, this machine has been non-functional for the last three years as the transformer for this machine is out of order.

He further went on to say that there are no trained persons for the maintenance of the machine and  spare parts are also not available in the state. Complaints to concern authority have not brought any positive response till today. And when the the whether is cloudy and on rainy days the problem of cloths not drying comes up, leading to the cancellation of operations. But for emergency operations new cloths are being used.
The situation will get worse during the winter season as the clothes which usually dry in a day will take two days at least.

Due to the non completion of the newly constructed room of the Department of Mechanised Laundry, the Rs 90 lakh machine is still being kept unused for the last three years, he added.

Speaking to this reporter, Dr L Khomdon, Medical Superintendent, JN Hospital said that such type of case has never occurred in his term and is really a  matter of shame.

He asked for Okram Kirankumar, Supervisor of the Laundry, JN Hospital and discussed the matter openly. A bit of verbal argument erupted among the MS and the staffs of the Department of Laundry.

Later on the MS gave instructions for buying a big washing machine which has got a drying facility and place it in the Laundry. He further assured that there will be routine operation from tomorrow itself. Ten operations which was scheduled for today have been cancelled due to the problem.

Sources:- Hueiyen Lanpao

Categories: health, News Tags: , , ,

RIMS for the first time introduces Biometric Attendance Recording System

September 22, 2011 5 comments

Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS) has so far produced 845 specialist doctors to its credit and for the first time has introduced Biometric Attendance Recording System in the institute to create work ethics among its employees.

Earlier known as Regional Medical College (RMC), it was established in 1972 and came to be known as Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS) on April 1, 2007. It has so far produced 2533 doctors of which 845 are specialist doctors in different fields.

Official sources revealed that due to the advancement in the field of health care system, the institute has been able to produce another 22 M Phill in Clinical Psychology. The doctors and specialist doctors produced by this institute are serving in different parts of the state as well as outside the state.

The source further said that RIMS has for the first time introduced Biometric Attendance Recording System to basically create a work ethics among its employees. This will enable the employees to perform their work accurately. It will also help to streamline their works.

Two broad bands of 4mbps and 100 mbps have also been installed in the institute. Sixty four CT scanner, Anesthetic Work station, Urodynamic system, equipments of ERCP and 7 Blood Glass Analyzer has also been installed in the institute.… Read More

via 845 specialist doctors to RIMS’ credit

RIMS should lead the way

September 17, 2011 Leave a comment

The establishment of RIMS, then RMC on April 14, 1972 was a watershed moment in Manipur’s story of progress and development. For, its coming into being made a significant difference in the health scenario in Manipur. The health sector saw a sea change. Before the establishment of RIMS, the health care sysytem in Manipur was in a rudimentary stage. The state lacked infrastructure, equipments, there were few doctors and nurses. Specialised doctors with PG degrees could be counted on the fingertips. Vellore, Dibrugarh used to be familiar names because, that was where patients form Manipur used to head to for treatment. All these have changed now. And RIMS in its 39 years of existance played a major role in this much improved health scenario in Manipur. The RIMS hospital now has all the major spcialised departments, patients no longer need to go to far off places for treatment of many of the ailments. This has gone a long way in making health care accessible to many people who do not have the means to go out of the state for treatment. RIMS has proved to be a boon for not only the people of the state but also for a large number of patients from neighbouring Nagaland, Mizoram and other states. Another very important contribution of RIMS is the thousands of doctors who have passed out of its portal.  These doctors, mostly from the north eastern region have fanned out to their respective states, teaching in Medical colleges, working in hospitals, practicing privately, all of them engaged in enchancing medical care in the region.

With the upgardation of to Regional Institute of Medical Sciences and having come directly under the Union Ministry of Health andFamily Welfare, one can look forward to much improved infrastructure, latest medical equipments, much better trained personnel, many more departments of specialisation and super-specialisation. According to the Director of RIMS, a Dental college is set to commence in the next academic sesssion, the Blood Bank has been upgraded to Blood Transfusion Department, intake capacity in MBBS and PG courses have been increased, advanced technology CT scan machine etc have been acquired, among other things. All this is very good news and will definite contribute significantly to further enhancing the medical care delivery system. Ultimately, it will save more lives.

But there are some issues which need to be look into.  The first on our list is the rampant indulgence in private practice by the doctors/ teaching staff of the institute. It is illegal, which we suppose everyone of them know, and it is unethical. Besides, the trend of private practice has greatly affected the working of the hospital. Exploitation of patients for financial gains is another serious consequence of this trend. Another issue, is the lack of professionalism and shoddy service in the hospital. Despite the best of facilities, highly qualified and specialist doctors, exeprienced nurses and other staff, many patients (though mostly from the economically better off section) prefer to go to private hospitals. A trust deficit in the working of the hospital is slowly creeeping in among the people. Then there is the question of hospital environment which leaves much to be desired in terms of cleanliness and hygiene.

RIMS authority should look into these issues, bring about a change in the mindset of its employees, a change in the working of he hospital so that it provides a more professional and caring service to the patients. RIMS given all that is at its disposal in terms of man, machine and expertise, should lead the way in providing better health care facilities not only to the people of the state but to the rest of the region. And who knows, it might even become the favoured medical tourism destination for our South East Asian brethrens.

Sources:- Hueiyen Lanpao

Are doctors really protected

September 11, 2011 Leave a comment

Are doctors really protected – Presentation Transcript

  1. ARE DOCTORS REALLY PROTECTED? DR. AVINASH BHONDWE PRESIDENT, IMA, PUNE
  2. PROTECTION
  3. ARE DOCTORS REALLY PROTECTED? PUNCHING BAG
  4. ARE DOCTORS REALLY PROTECTED?
    • POLITICIANS
    • HOOLIGANS
    • LAW
    • MEDIA
    • SO CALLED SOCIALISTS
    • DOCTORS’ COMMUNITY
    • PATIENTS
  5. POLITICAL ATTACKS
    • 1. A WELL KNOWN POLITICIAN TREATED & DIED IN A BIG HOSPITAL
  6. ATTACKS ON DOCOTRS & HOSPITALS
    • ON August 26, POLITICAL PARTY activists reduced to rubble the 200-bed Sunitidevi Singhania Hospital in Thane
    • A POPULAR LEADER Mr. Anand Dighe,
    • treated for a fractured leg, died.
  7. ATTACKS ON DOCOTRS & HOSPITALS
    • In three hours of mayhem, they torched the building and smashed ambulances, medical equipments and everything in sight. Patients, doctors and nurses were sent scurrying for cover.
    • A six-month-old child with a respiratory problem and a 65-year-old man suffering from a kidney ailment died after their life-support machines were wrecked.
  8. HOOLIGANS ATTACKS
  9. HOOLIGANS ATTACKS
    • IN PUNE’S CANTONMENT HOSPITAL,
    • POONA HOSPITAL, SAHYADRI
    • HOSPITAL, SURYA HOSPITALS
    • HOOLIGANS ATTACKED AFTER
    • DEATH OF A PATIENT
    • DOCTORS WERE MANHANDLED & ABUSED
    • EXTERIORS & OTHER THINGS DESTROYED
  10. ARE DOCTORS REALLY PROTECTED?
    • WHATEVER IS HAPPENNING IN PUNE IS OCCURING EVERYWHERE IN MAHARASHTRA
    • MUMBAI- ANDHERI,MALAD
    • NASIK, AURANGABAD, NAGPUR,KOLHAPUR
    • JUNNAR,TALEGAON,REMOTE PLACES
  11. LAW:- AGAINST DOCTORS
    • CPC
    • CIVIL CASE
    • MEDICAL COUNCIL OF INDIA
    • CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT
    • PNDT
    • CLINICAL ESTABLISHMENT ACT
  12. LAW ENFORCEMENT
    • Should IPC Section 304A be applicable to doctors?
    • Whoever causes the death of any person by doing any rash or negligent act not amounting to culpable homicide, shall be punished with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to two years, or with fine, or with both.
  13. On August 05,2005 a Three Judge Bench of Supreme Court of India of Chief Justice R.C.Lahoti, Justice G.P.Mathur and Justice P.K.Balasubramanyam by order quashed prosecution of a medical professional under Section 304-A / 34 IPC and disposed of all the interlocutory applications that doctors should not be held criminally responsible unless there is a prima-facie evidence before the Court in the form of a credible opinion from another competent doctor, preferably a Government doctor in the same field of medicine supporting the charges of rash and negligent act.
  14. LAW ENFORCEMENT
    • Should IPC Section 304A be applicable to doctors?
    • 304A is a cognizable offence, which means that the police can act without a warrant for arrest.
    • Therefore, it is proposed that the Indian Penal Code be amended in such manner that for cases involving complaint with respect to medical negligence, a warrant for arrest from a magistrate would be required before the practitioner could be arrested.
  15. LAW ENFORCEMENT
    • 1.Concept of negligence is different in civil and
    • criminal law.
    • 2. Doctors and medical practice have to be treated
    • differently.
    • 3. The alleged negligence should be of gross nature to
    • attract criminal liability.
    • 4. Many a complaint prefer recourse to criminal
    • process as a tool for pressuring doctor for extracting
    • unjust compensation
  16. LAW ENFORCEMENT
    • 5. A private complaint may not be entertained
    • unless the complainant produces prima facie
    • evidence.
    • 6. The service done by doctor is the noblest of
    • all.They have to be protected.
    • 7. The loss of reputation suffered by a doctor
    • cannot be compensated by any standards.
  17. LAW ENFORCEMENT
    • 8. A doctor should not be arrested in a routine
    • manner.
    • 9. Guidelines have been prescribed by apex
    • court.
    • 10. Statutory rules need to be framed by the
    • Government of India and State Govts. in
    • consultation with Medical Council of India.
  18. 3.MEDIA
    • Summary of the current situation
    • Use brief bullets, discuss details verbally
  19. DOCTORS COMMUNITY
    • DOCTORS DO NOT SUPPORT THEIR COLLEAGUES IN CRISIS
    • DOCTORS CRITISIZE EACH OTHER
    • MANY A TIMES MAIN VINDICTIVE REASONS ARE GIVEN BY OUR COLLEAGUES
    • WE ARE NOT UNITED
  20. US & THEM
  21. PATIENTS
    • LOOK UPON DOCTORS GET EASY MONEY
    • FIRMLY BELIEVE THAT WE LOOT THEM
    • LESS MONEY – MORE SERVICE IS EXPECTED
    • WHEN SOMETHING GOES WRONG ALWAYS BELIEVE THAT WRONG TREATMENT IS GIVEN
    • NO MORE CONSIDERS DOCTORS AS DEMI GODS
  22. DOCTOR PATIENT RELATIONSHIP
    • BASED ON MERELY A BUSINESS RELATION- BOTH SIDES
    • DOCTORS STILL RECOGNISE A PATIENT BY A DISEASE- NOT BY NAME
    • THE MORALITY & ETHICAL BELIEFS OF THE SOCIETY IS CHANGING
    • FAMILY- FROM UNITED FAMILY TO NUCLEAR
  23. DOCOTRS’ PROTECTION ACT HISTORY-ANDHRA
    • Thousands of Doctors continued their strike in Government Hospitals across Andhra Pradesh, from
    • 2 December to 18 December 2007.
    • OPD services were hit as doctors went on strike after a legislator of the MiM party allegedly manhandled medical staff at Hyderabad’s Niloufer children’s hospital.
    • Doctors demanded that a non-bailable case be registered against the MIM MLA Afsar Khan
    • Doctors wanted the Government to pass an ordinance to ensure security at Government Hospitals.
  24. DOCOTRS’ PROTECTION ACT HISTORY-ANDHRA
    • (a) Registered Medical Practitioners, working in Medicare Institutions
    • (including those having provisional Registration;
    • (b) Registered nurse;
    • (c) Medical students;
    • (d) Nursing students;
    • (e) Practical workers employed and working in Medicare Service Institutions.
  25. DOCOTRS’ PROTECTION ACT HISTORY-ANDHRA
    • Any act of violence against Medicare service person or damage to property in a Medicare service Institution is prohibited.
    • Any Offender who commits any act in contravention, shall be punished with imprisonment for a period of Three years and with fine, which may extend to
    • fifty thousand rupees.
    • Any offence committed under Section , shall be cognizable and non cognizance of Bailable. O ffence
  26. DOCOTRS’ PROTECTION ACT HISTORY-ANDHRA
    • In addition to the punishment specified in section the offender recovery of loss for the damage Caused to the property shall be liable to a penalty of twice the amount of purchase price of medical equipment damaged and loss caused to the property as determined by the Court trying the offender.
  27. DOCOTRS’ PROTECTION ACT HISTORY-ANDHRA
    • If the offender has not paid the penal amount under sub-section (1),the said sum shall be recovered under the provisions of the Andhra
    • Pradesh Recovery Act, 1864 as if it were an arrears of land revenue due from him.
    • The provisions of this Ordinance shall be in addition to and not in Ordinance not derogation of the provisions of any other law, for the time begin in force.
  28. DOCOTRS’ PROTECTION ACT HISTORY-MAHARASHTRA
    • In December 2007 IMA Maharashtra demanded similar act in Maharashtra
    • The then Deputy Chief & Home Minister Mr. R.R. Patil assured the better law in six months
    • In June 2008- IMA Pune, demanded the quicker decision about the Law
    • On 10 th Oct. 2008, IMA, Mah. Organised a State wide Token Strike- 100% successful
  29. DOCOTRS’ PROTECTION ACT HISTORY-MAHARASHTRA CURRENT POSITION
    • The draft given by IMA accepted by State Cabinet meeting
    • The Bill is still pending in Legislative Assembly for discussion- even after 2 sessions
    • There seems to be some hindrance from Political Parties
    • DOCTORS’ LOBBYING
  30. THANK YOU

View more presentations from Avinash Bhondwe

In sickness and in dearth

August 4, 2011 Leave a comment

‘These things take time’ is the routine answer from officialdom when asked why things are not improving in India’s public healthcare system. But for the chronically ill patients who have been forced to live in a urinal on the premises of India’s premier referral hospital, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), time is running out. In a shocking story, this paper has chronicled the appalling manner in which people from distant places, many with heart ailments and cancers, have no place to go while awaiting treatment other than the pavement and in some cases, as documented, a urinal. If this does not shake up a moribund health ministry, nothing will. That these unfortunate people had to travel all the way to AIIMS for treatment is in itself a scandal. Clearly, it is because the specialised care they need is not remotely close at hand in other states.

With a patient to bed ratio of 1:65 and a doctor to patient ratio of 1:1,300, AIIMS is already stretched to breaking point. It is no secret that India today has a dual burden of disease with not just a deadly cocktail of communicable ailments but also lifestyle ones like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Seventy per cent of cancers are detected in advanced stages. These cannot be treated at local facilities, they require specialised care. But as the plight of those at AIIMS shows, the malaise at the bottom of the pyramid which is public health centres equally affects the top-end. The same crippling infrastructural deficiencies have created a situation where getting the appropriate treatment is never guaranteed. The ministry of health and state health departments as always assure us that initiatives are underway. If so, we would like to hear more about them.

One ambitious plan has been to decongest AIIMS and move non-critical care to another facility. But that is a drop in the ocean given the millions who need the kind of care that facilities like AIIMS can provide. For years, the health ministry, run by one inept minister after another, has been proposing to set up AIIMS-like centres in other metros and towns across the country. This would mean that patients could access them far more easily and would not have to come all the way to the capital for affordable, quality care. Even if by some miracle such facilities sprang up overnight with adequate infrastructure, the next problem would be that of personnel. There are massive lacunae in the field of nursing and ancillary health staff, all vital for critical care. But, we presume, plugging that will ‘take time’. If the government moves to provide safe, clean shelter for these patients living out their days in a urinal, it would send out a small, but right signal.

Sources:- Hindustan Times

Paranormal Activities Alert: Is the JNIMS hospital spooked?

If reports are to be believed, the gynaecology department in the JNIMS hospital is haunted. The exact spot where the strongest paranormal activity has been reported is the area from the toilet and the entire stretch of the corridor leading to it from the ward. Affected people describe the experience of sensing the presence of someone close by, or tingling sensations, or changes in temperature, or heavy footsteps following them when there was clearly not a single person in that are, that is apart from the victims themselves. These experiences have been related mostly by attendants of patients, but it seems the staff on night duty have had similar experiences.

What makes this story relevant is how such activities, which only be described as paranormal, affect the attendants of seriously ill people. It is traumatic enough tending after near and dear ones and to top it all face paranormal activity could be nerve wracking. One step to clam frayed nerves could be establish the facts, that is, whether paranormal activity is going on or not in that ward. Even if is established that such activities do take place it could comfort a lot of people. The human mind is such that once faced with the inevitable it adjusts to live with it.

The answer would lie in finding intrepid people who can operate electronic voice sensors, detect movement and record temperature fluctuations. One believes temperature changes which take place suddenly are indicative of paranormal activity. These can be done at the dead of night, and anyway the scary happenings, it seems, take place only late in the night.

The ambience of a hospital should be such that it soothes frayed nerves. The very presence of doctors, nurses and other competent staff should provide succour to those who feel their life is at the end of the tether. It should be a place of treatment and convalescence, a place where supportive kith, kin and good friends go to see people in distress.

Fear of the unknown, particularly the scary type could be pernicious to inmates and their attendants, and in this superstition laden society of ours, the next thing we could be witnessing is bizarre spiritual cleansing exercises or downright exorcisms. On the other hand we also do not want a scenario where you have a seriously ill patient who needs constant attention, scared as hell at the idea of dying, only to find his or her attendant coming back from the toilet ashen faced, trembling like a leaf and needing more medical attention than he or she does. Or worse still who literally dropped dead out of horror and shock.

Sources: Hueiyen News

Categories: Editorials, health, News Tags: , ,