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Full Marks to Director RIMS, Imphal

January 26, 2012 2 comments

Sir,

It was very painful to learn about the incident in RIMS on the night of 19th December when students misbehaved, conducted themselves like a bunch of hooligans and turned an unruly crowd against the Director. The obnoxious behaviour on that fateful night and subsequent cease work followed by a smear campaign by these guilty students was totally unexpected, shameful to say the least and certainly deserves widespread condemnation. Student community must refrain from indulging in such unwarranted reaction and slandering, and admit their mistakes with humility and grace. They definitely deserve to be told where their place is and taught a lesson or two on how students are expected to conduct themselves, should they go astray.

I fully support and endorse with the bold and justified actions taken by the Director and kudos to him for this somewhat unprecedented drive. He has proved beyond doubts that he means business and will not tolerate nonsense of any sorts while he is at the helm of affairs. We certainly require more gutsy persons like him to head our rotting educational institutes so as to prevent further slump. In fact, I would have appreciated all the more had the Director gone a step further to rusticate and send those rowdy students home so that they can regret their impulsive outbursts at leisure.

At a time when the people of Manipur are facing the most severe power shortages and load shedding experienced in recent memories, the electrically pampered students of RIMS (who get 24 hrs uninterrupted power supply) have the audacity to claim right to use all sorts of power guzzling fancy/modern electric gadgets against existing institute orders. I am sure all that those students are more than aware of potential fire hazard inherent in use of high voltage gadgets en masse, especially in hostels and other heavily populated buildings (recent AMRI hospital fire in Kolkata still being fresh and vivid in our minds).

An average resident of Manipur (the lesser mortals like me who has neither a “VIP Connection” nor has a “Double Phase Connection”) hardly gets three/four hours of electric supply in a day. As a result, our children study with solar/emergency lamps (as electricity supply is inadequate to even charge inverter batteries and neighbours objects to generator noise as a matter of right in Manipur). On the other hand, students of RIMS, who would face the same pathetic situation at their homes, want to have the luxury of consuming unlimited (free of cost) amount of electricity even at the extent of not adhering to orders institute administration. They should consider themselves lucky with 24X7 uninterrupted power supply they are getting, concentrate on their primary business of being medical students rather than indulging into acts which are generally committed by the illiterate and irresponsible sections of the society.

The Director accompanied by the warden (who is a woman) and male security personnel has full rights and authority to enter the girls’ hostel, especially when the intentions are not mala fide. Are the girl students trying to say that no male fire tender should enter and douse fire in girls’ hostel and wait for arrival of female fire tenders in the unfortunate eventuality of fire breaking out. The PG students who marched towards the Director’s Official Residence should consider themselves lucky that the security guards did not open fire and merely resorted to pointing the gun at them as alleged.

Thus, it is in their own interests that the student community shed “mob mentality”, concentrate on their studies and endeavour to become good doctors and serve their kith and kin in their respective communities/states in right earnest rather than demean the noble profession. RIMS authorities also may consider taking stern disciplinary actions against erring students so as to deter them from venturing into misadventures in future. After all, the society looks up to medical fraternity as healers and even as demigods at time at certain places. Let us not let this healthy mutual trust and respect be dissipated because of irresponsible behaviour on the part of few offenders. I hope the student community, particularly students of NIT Manipur are listening and getting the message loud and clear too.

Yours faithfully,
Lt Col (retd) Naorem Kumar
Administrator, NIT Manipur

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via The Sangai Express

Categories: health, News Tags: , , ,

Slur on RIMS Dir, shutdown

January 26, 2012 Leave a comment

IMPHAL, Jan 20 : PG students of RIMS, including interns and staff and numbering around 500 have abstained from casualty service and emergency with effect from 10 pm today, following an altercation with the Director of the institute.

Speaking to The Sangai Express, a group of students from RIMS said that security staff of RIMS accompanied by the Director descended on the girls’ hostel today evening at about 7 and confiscated all the electrical appliances without any prior information.

This was in violation of the rules of RIMS which say that no males are allowed inside the girls’ hostel, said the PG students and added that all the security personnel were males.

However RIMS Director said that it was a drive against use of electrical appliances, especially heaters and added that the warden was present, who is a woman. The PG students revolted, he added.

As news of the incident spread, a group of PG students including the PG Association went to meet the Director at his official quarters but they were stopped by the security personnel manning the residence of the Director and manhandled. The security personnel also verbally abused the PG students, claimed the students and added that they also pointed their guns at the students who merely wanted to talk things over with the Director over the incident.

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via The Sangai Express

Categories: health, News Tags: , , ,

Can Manipur become medical value travel destination of South East Asia?

December 8, 2011 Leave a comment

Can Manipur become medical value travel destination of South East Asia?.

‘Future belongs to those who believe in the beauties of their dreams’.

I am a passionate believer of human potential and so also of Manipur. We have abundance of opportunities because of our location, hospitality nature of our region, comfortable weather, land, lake, hills, short surface connectivity with Myanmar, Trans Asia Highway, possible International Airport at Imphal, India’s “Look East” policy etc. We can very well visualize Manipur becoming the healthcare hub of South East Asia. We can solve most of our problems by addressing the advantages rather than the disadvantages.

‘If you really understand the problem, the answer will come out of it, because the answer is not separate from the problem’.
– Jiddu Krishnamurti
Healthcare is one of the fastest growing industries in India. Manipur is not an exception. A recent CII-McKinsey study on healthcare says medical tourism alone can contribute Rs 5,000- Rs 10,000 crore (Rs 50-100 billion) additional revenue for upmarket tertiary hospitals by 2012, and will account for 3-5 per cent of the total healthcare delivery market and  only 10% of the opportunity has been tapped in India.

India’s medical tourism is through Non-Residential Indians, Patients from countries with underdeveloped facilities and Patients from developed countries because of long waiting list. India has adopted NABH (National Accreditation Board for Hospitals & Healthcare Providers) program to improve the quality to international standard for attracting more foreigner medical tourists.

Healthcare is a major service Manipur can sell to neighboring states and countries. Myanmar is our advantage. First we need to have good hospitals. Till now there is no NABH hospital in NE India. Myanmar patients are going to Bangkok and Singapore for their advanced medical treatment which is costlier than India. Health Visa is not issued to Myanmar nationals to visit Manipur as it is issued to Bangladeshi at the border to visit India for medical reasons. Bus service between Mandalay and Imphal is yet to be materialized for different reasons. India’s Look East Policy is delayed in implementation. The situation is now difficult but not impossible to go ahead because of Chinese speed and dominance in Myanmar. After all nobody wants to go to a war zone for treatment. Good relationship with Myanmar cannot be established so long as they are arrested for illegal entry to Manipur in spite of PAP removal. We need a leader who will take 100 percent responsibility for successful implementation of the policy.

New trend of diseases and our focus areas.
Infectious diseases, caused by invading microorganisms, were the leading causes of death a century ago. Chronic diseases, caused by a variety of lifestyle and other factors, are the leading causes of death today. Leading causes of death overall are heart disease, cancer, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases (emphysema, chronic bronchitis), diabetes, accident and emergency.

And the main objectives of Tourism are in the specialities of Cardiac  Care, plastic and Cosmetic surgery, organ transplantation, reproductive IVF and ICSI procedures, Joint replacement. The medical care can be combined with related tourism activities such  as spiritual and  eco-tourism. Flow of Myanmar medical tourists depends upon our pricing, branding, hospital accreditation, quality control, categorization of hospitals etc.

Healthcare is investment intensive for technological advancement and nothing is free. In May 2008, McKinsey and Company reported that primary considerations in medical tourism are:
* 40% seek advanced technology,
*  32% seek better healthcare,
* 15% seek faster medical services
* while only 9% of travellers seek lower costs.

We need to update the facilities to attract medical tourists. Organ transplantation act needs to be passed in our state. Government alone cannot handle healthcare of 1.2 billion populations in India. Private sector participation is the need of the hour. Public Private Partnership is now the new ‘Mantra’ to provide affordable quality healthcare to the masses. Categorisation of healthcare institutes and quality control may be undertaken.

We need to rethink our healthcare planning and develop Infrastructure and HR, Quality and Accreditation, Law and Order, Accessibility, Affordability according to our opportunity.

In 2006 more than 2 million medical tourists availed services in South-east Asia from all corners of the world. Revenues close to US$ 450 million generated. But India had only 2% share. In 2007 India had 0.2 million medical tourists only. Singapore and Bangkok are healthcare destination in South East Asia. A single hospital in Bangkok, Brumugrade, first to get JCI (Joint Commission International ) accreditation in Asia is treating  0.45 million foreigners per year.

‘India is home for 16% of total world population and 21% of total global diseases.  In India the Health Care spending is 3.4% and Military 18.6% of its total spending. Developed National spends 12-17% in Health.  India needs a holistic massive USD 80 Billion investment to bring up the quality of healthcare matching to developed nations. Every new bed creates employment for 5 personnel directly and about 25 personnel indirectly. There is a huge requirement for health care workforce estimated to be 70 to 80 million jobs in the next 10 yrs, adding 2 to 3 % p.a. to GDP.’

India currently has 0.6 beds per 1,000 and the global average – 4.7 beds per 1000. India needs 1.7 million beds to meet 2 beds per 1000 only. There is a shortfall of 1.4 million doctors and 2.8 Nurses million. North Eastern India needs 52000 nurses immediately. MCI (Medical Council of India) has recommended the centre to establish 500 medical colleges in 5 years to meet the gap. Till now Eastern India has the lowest number of medical colleges compare to rest of the country. Manipur needs more beds and medical colleges to increase state exchequer.  More than 300 students who are going privately outside the state per year for medical studies.

In Manipur, a task force constituted by Ministries of Health and Family Welfare and Tourism may assess the opportunities for promoting our state as one of the health destination and formulate policy to promote and control the quality of healthcare of the state. Only quality service will attract more medical value tourists and generate nearly 2 lacs of employment in turbulent Manipur.

Can Manipur become healthcare destination of South East Asia? The choice is ours. Grow or die.

The writer is CMD and Consultant Plastic Surgeon, Shija Hospitals, Langol.

Vice President, Manipur Chamber of Commerce and Industries.

President, Indian Medical Association, Manipu State Branch. And he can be reached at drpalin@shijahospitals.com

Categories: health, Opinion Tags: , ,

XXVII AMAMECON – 2011 INVITATIONS & PROGRAMMES SCHEDULES, Manipur

November 16, 2011 2 comments

XXVII AMAMECON – 2011

INVITATION

 Dear Colleagues & Friends,
            The Indian Medical Association, Manipur State Branch’s Medical Conference (XXVII AMAMECON – 2011) will be held on   10th & 11th December 2011 at IMA House, Lamphelpat, Imphal.
            The organising committee warmly invites all the members of IMA and all doctors in the state for their active participation in the conference.
            This year’s IMA theme is “Be in health. Be active in public health.” In tune with this the conference aims to integrate various specialities in the field of medical sciences by the way of interactive deliberations and discussions for the common goal of  “Health for all”
            We will strive to make the conference more meaningful, deeply scientific and interesting with a wide array of Award Sessions, Guest Lectures, Orations, Mediquiz & Colourful cultural programmes etc.
            We look forward for your timely registration as Delegates and take active participation in the conference and make it a grand success.
            With warm regards.
 Dr. Kh. Palin                                                      Dr.S. Gojendra Singh
 Chairman                                                           Organising Secretary
 
 
 
 
 
The Details of XVII AMAMECON – 2011 including the programmes schedules and registration needs can be downloaded from here :- http://on.fb.me/t1Lm3k

UNC’s Economic Blockade Leads To Health Care Crisis In Manipur

November 13, 2011 Leave a comment

UNC’s Economic Blockade Leads To Health Care Crisis In Manipur, as the two major hospitals in Manipur have suspended normal surgical works for the last three days as stock of oxygen in the hospitals is alarmingly low resulting from the ongoing economic blockade along National Highways 37 and NH-2, sources from the two hospitals said today.

The Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences (JNIMS) and Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS) hospitals  have limited stock of oxygen and the stock has been kept for emergency use only, the sources said and added that even some medicines prescribed for diabetes, blood pressure, etc. for daily use are not found openly in the markets.

The biggest private hospital in the state, Shija also reportedly faces depleted oxygen stock though the hospital is continuing normal operations to patients. But, how long the stock will last is a question of uncertainty, sources from the hospital said.

The counter economic blockade called by the UNC against creation of Sadar Hills District which started from August 21 has completed 83 days today. Notably, Economic blockade called by SHDDC had called off after signing an MoU with the state government after nearly 100 days of blockade.

Sources:- The Sangai Express

Categories: health, News Tags: , , ,

Dengue officially declared as epidemic outbreak in Churachandpur District of Manipur

November 12, 2011 Leave a comment

Dengue is due to a flavivirus transmitted by the bite of the Aedes mosquito

Symptoms and Signs of Dengue infection

 

IMPHAL, Nov 11: Follo-wing outbreak of an unknown disease suspec-ted to be dengue in Churachandpur, the State Vector Borne Disease Control Society under the State Malaria Officer has collected blood samples from seven infected persons and sent the samples to RIMS laboratory  which has been accredited by the Government of India.

It is reported that more samples would be collected from different places of Churachandpur starting from tomorrow for further laboratory test.

Talking to The Sangai Express, State Malaria Officer Dr Ibochouba said that contentment measures like fogging and awareness programmes about Tiger mosquito species Ades, the carrier of Slavirus which causes

 

dengue have been taken up.

However, there is no specific method of treatment  if the samples being tested in RIMS laboratory turn out positive.

Though there is no specific drug for treatment of dengue, there is no reason to panic, Dr Ibochouba said.

Dengue was first discovered at Moreh in 2007, and there was no case of death due to infection by dengue, he said.

Symptoms like fever and ache in different parts of the body do not always mean dengue.

The symptoms include retrobulbar pain (acute pain within eyes) and growth of greenish spots on body parts, Dr Ibochouba explained.

Out of 12 different cases which were tested by the District Malaria Officer, Churachandpur, only one was found dengue-combo positive.

Dengue-combo is not exactly dengue. At the same time, it cannot be said that dengue-combo is not related with dengue.

When blood samples of 1000 people are found positive for Slavirus which causes dengue, only one or two persons may be infected by dengue.

As there is no specific method for treatment of dengue, the general practice is, injection of IV fluids and providing other supportive treatments in order to strengthen immune system of patients.

Growth of purpuric rash (greenish spots) on body parts could be observed on people infected by dengue seriously.

When the condition worsens, the greenish spots would start bleeding and this is an indication that platelet counts have decreased.

In such situation, the patient with be injected wit fresh platelets.

Incidentally, RIMS has the facility to remove RBC and WBC from blood and concentrate only platelets in blood, informed Dr Ibochouba.

Sources:- The Sangai Express

Categories: health, News Tags: , , , ,

IMA joins issue with health ministry on short-term medical course

November 2, 2011 Leave a comment

NEW DELHI: A day after TOI reported on the Union health ministry’s plans to roll out the 3.5-year medical degree, the Indian Medical Association (IMA) asked the Medical Council of India (MCI) not to compromise on patients’ safety.

Reacting to the three-week ultimatum given by Union health minister Ghulab Nabi Azad to the MCI on the BRM (Bachelor of Rural Medicine), national president of IMA Dr Vinay Aggarwal on Tuesday said the MCI would not bend before the government and refused to endorse the course. IMA called for more debates ahead of falling in line with the government’s directive. “IMA is willing to cooperate with the government to find a solution on rural health,” the letter said.

It added, “There are better ways to overcome the shortage of modern medicine professionals in rural area. Lowering the standard of medical education and producing low-quality professionals is not the solution.”

Dr Aggarwal said, the MCI is mandated to upkeep certain standards and cannot be bullied. “It is duty bound to consider patient safety and cannot obliviously reverse a process initiated by the Bhore Committee report of 1946 to abolish such mediocre short-term courses.” IMA says it is not convinced about the government’s intentions on BRM.

“The notion that over 30% of primary health centres do not have a MBBS doctor is not supported by statistics. Only 5.3% of PHCs are without a qualified doctor. For whatever small shortfall that exists, compulsory rural health posting of MBBS graduates for one-year after internship would make available 30,000 MBBS graduates every year. The National Human Rights Commission has come out against such a course, and has termed it as discrimination,” IMA said.

TOI on Tuesday had reported that Azad set the MCI a three-week deadline to endorse this new course, failing which the ministry will issue a directive to the MCI to recognize and roll out the course. Azad had said that the course had enjoyed the backing of all the state governments for long, and attributed the tardiness to MCI’s apathetic attitude.

“We have made up our mind to introduce the Bachelor of Rural Medicine degree. Sometimes the MCI gets influenced by its own fraternity. With doctors unwilling to serve in rural areas, even after being given incentives, we are left with no choice but to introduce a new cadre of health workers,” Azad had told TOI.

He had added, “We want an MCI stamp on the degree so that it is universally recognized. The syllabus of the course is ready and it is need based. If MCI endorses it, students will get the confidence that the degree has a standing. If MCI does not agree, we will send them a directive which they have to adhere to.”

Union health secretary P K Pradhan had added, “They will be rural public health officers and will look after primary and preventive healthcare. They will not carry out surgeries.”

Sources:- Times of India